General FAQ

Are you guys still a font company or do you just make, like, ceramics and stuff?

Naw, it’s always been like this. Everything we do informs the next thing, and that next thing is rarely realized in the same media as the last. Take Yorklyn Stencil for example. It started as a set of numbers for the Heath ceramic clocks and became a set of three fonts. A ten-year-old typographic concept became the Velo collection of bike gear (and fonts).

Who made this new internet web site for you?

Okay, this isn’t a frequently asked question, because the web site is new and it would not have been asked frequently. We just know that the last time we did a new web site in 2001 people asked us frequently about who did it, so we’re anticipating the frequency of the question again. Bondé Angeline designed most of the “flat” original layouts, Jess Collins and Adam Cruz made sure the pitchers looked decent and Rich Roat changed his mind a lot. Our friends at Friends of the Web did lots of heavy lifting and were kind enough to tell us when we wanted to do something that didn’t make sense. They were right lots of the time, and if you hire them, you should listen to them because you’ll end up saving lots of money. They also have a guy on staff who is a really good chef and they all sit down and have a family style lunch every day. If you visit them, go at lunch time and pass the local pole beans. Ben Kiel, who works by himself and does not have a family style lunch every day, was instrumental in getting us down the home stretch.

How come you have fonts, hard goods and portfolio pieces all on the same page on your web site? Man it’s confusing.

It was Rich’s idea, so please email him here to tell him how much you love it. We are currently taking applications for the VP of User Experience position.

Are you hiring or looking for interns?

Yes and no. Bondé and Jess were interns before we hired them, but they pretty much hate us now, so definitely take that into consideration. House Industries is a team effort—the chemistry between all of us is just as important as any individual’s talent. We are very careful about who we put into the formula. If you want to mix it up with us, please send some work samples, your name, an email address and maybe a phone number, but let the work speak for itself. You can pretty much see the things we suck at, like The Internet, social media, and marketing, so if you have something you think you can add in one of those places, please get in touch.

Can I call?

Yes, of course. Anthropomorphic audio interaction models are are anxiously awaiting your call between the hours of nine and five Greenwich Mean Time minus four. The land line is 302-234-2356.

Can I visit?

Yeah, just give us a little warning. Bondé will bust our that fancy organic cleaner that smells like grandma’s bathroom, Rich will fire up the purple Dyson to suck up the dead stinkbugs and Ken will throw away his empty Wawa coffee cups. Other than that, there’s not much to see here but we’d love to have you. Bring food. Like when Tom Bejgrowicz (pronouced bay-GROW-its) comes by, he always brings artisanal Amish cheese and crackers from Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

What happened to you guys, you used to be a bunch of smartasses?

You know, the old powdered iced tea in the water cooler trick was funny in 1994, but now we all just want a cool drink and need less sugar in our diets.

What about that goofy packaging you guys used to make?

We still do it on a limited basis, but we will only ship with a complete order of a desktop font collection. For example, we printed a double skidload of Street Vans in the 90s and we still have plenty. It even has a compartment for a 3.5” floppy disk, but we don’t have any more of those unfortunately.

Does House do custom design, lettering or illustration?

Yes, we sometimes take on commercial jobs but we’re a small shop and there’s a lot of stuff to do just to keep our heads above water. The Work section of our site has a sampling of commercial, internal and art projects. If those don’t scare you off, please hit us up.

How does Dusty Rhodes, the American Dream, feel about Ric Flair?

I don’t have to say a lot more about how I feel about Ric Flair. No respect. No honor. There is no honor among thieves in the first place. He put hard times on Dusty Rhodes and his family. You don’t know what hard times are, daddy.

T-Shirt Size chart

Mens

Inches

Size S M L XL XXL
Chest 34-36 38-40 42-44 46-48 48-50
Waist 30-32 32-33 33-34 36-38 40-42

Centimeters

Size S M L XL XXL
Chest 86-91 97-102 107-112 117-122 122-127
Waist 76-81 81-84 84-86 91-97 102-107

Womens

Inches

Size S M L
Size 0-2 4-6 8-10
Chest 30-32 32-34 36-38
Waist 25-26 27-28 30-32

Centimeters

Size S M L
Size 0-2 4-6 8-10
Chest 76-81 81-86 91-97
Waist 64-66 69-71 76-81

Licensing FAQ

How much do your fonts cost?

Our pricing varies by collection. The best way to get basic and extended pricing is to click the “Buying Options” button at the top of each font collection’s page.

Where can I read the font licenses?

They are here.

Aw geez, I gotta read the whole thing?

Well, yeah, since you’re agreeing to its terms and all. If we all know the rules of the game, we’ll get along better.

What kind of font licenses can I purchase on this internet web site?

Traditional desktop license: This license is for traditional “desktop” use. This means you can install the fonts on a personal computer and use them for designing things, writing letters or just making big pretty words. The license fee is determined by how many devices can access the fonts.

Webfont license: This license is specifically for CSS @font-face “webfont” embedding. The license is sold per domain (subdomains are included) and the price varies with unique page views. Each domain is a separate license.

Mobile App License: This license is specifically for embedding fonts or subsets of the fonts in a mobile applications like the ones that do so much cool stuff on your iPhone, iPad, Android, Windows Mobile or Star Trek Communicator® device. If you’re going to use the font or letters, numbers or symbols from the font in a mobile application to generate live or “dynamic” text, then this is your ace. The license is sold by application, and each application is a separate purchase.

What if my usage does not fall under these three categories?

We handle these on a case-by-case basis. Please contact us and we can get you sorted out.

We have licensed your fonts and used them for a project. We are sending it to another vendor who is doing more work on the project. Can we just send your fonts along?

No. We license our fonts like software, as do most font companies. For example, if you give your vendor an Adobe Illustrator file, are they going to demand that you give them a copy of Adobe Illustrator as well? You spent the money to license the fonts properly, why shouldn’t they?

We have a font server, so do I only have to buy a license for the fonts for that single device?

No, you need a license for all the devices connected to that server that are going to use the fonts. The license reads “rasterizing device”. Any computer connected to that server considered a rasterizing device.

I am using your fonts to do a layout. I am collaborating with another designer in a separate location. Can I give them your fonts?

No, you cannot. We consider that a separate license. The fonts are licensed like software. If you’re both using Adobe Illustrator, Adobe’s license does not allow you to give the other designer a copy of the software. Same deal with the fonts.

Web Fonts FAQ

How do I use these woff and woff2 web fonts?

The woff and woff2 files are the standard formats for fonts used on web sites. You need to store them somewhere on your server, the same way you would with image files you are using on your web site. Then in your CSS style sheet, you implement an @font-face statement that refers to these files and assigns them each a nickname. Then in your CSS code, when you specify a font style and use that nickname, the browser will render the text using the web font, just as if the user had that font installed on their local system.

How do I use my web font on Typekit?

Proceed with your transaction as you would with any web font purchase. Click on “Account” to view your account data. Select the “Order History” tab. For the purchase you would like to use on Typekit, select the “Use This Family on Typekit” link. When the Typekit dialog comes up on your browser, sign in to Typekit, or create a new account [https://typekit.com/plans]. Then select the “Activate” button. You will then see your activated fonts in Typekit. You can choose the font, and select “Use Font” to get instructions on how to apply the code to your web site. For questions about implementing TypeKit hosted fonts on your web site, please see: https://helpx.adobe.com/typekit/using/add-fonts-website.html

How do I get capital height numbers instead of the bouncy up and down ones on my web site?

Numbers that have different heights are referred to as “text figures” or “old-style figures”. This style is intended to blend well with upper and lower case test and is best used in the body of text. Numbers that are all the same height as the capital letters are referred to as “lining figures” or “capital height figures.” This style is often used for headlines, or in tables of numbers.

Many of our fonts have the default numbers in the “text” style, with the “lining” style also in the font. In that case you can access the “lining” style by using CSS feature code calling out the “lnum” OpenType feature, similar to the following:

p {
font-family: “Neutraface Text”, sans-serif;
font-weight: normal;
font-kerning: normal;
font-variant-ligatures: common-ligatures, contextual;
font-variant-numeric: lining-nums;
-moz-font-feature-settings: “kern”, “liga”, “lnum”;
-ms-font-feature-settings: “kern”, “liga”, "lnum”;
-webkit-font-feature-settings: “kern”, “liga”, “lnum”;
font-feature-settings: “kern”, “liga”, “lnum”;
}

When I ordered web fonts, I received only .woff and .woff2 format files. I’ve heard about all these other formats, what about them?

The woff format (and the soon to be widely supported woff2) is sufficient for all modern browsers, as noted here: http://caniuse.com/#feat=woff

If you have a particularly odd use case which you believe requires another ancient format, please contact us.

Font Tech FAQ

How do I get capital height numbers instead of the bouncy up and down ones in my desktop programs?

Numbers that have different heights are referred to as “text figures” or “old-style figures”. This style is intended to blend well with upper and lower case test and is best used in the body of text. Numbers that are all the same height as the capital letters are referred to as “lining figures” or “capital height figures.” This style is often used for headlines, or in tables of numbers.

Many of our fonts have the default numbers in the “text” style, with the “lining” style also in the font. In that case you can access the “lining” style by using OpenType features.

In the Adobe Creative Suite programs, you can access the OpenType dialog by selecting the Window menu, then the Type flyout menu, then clicking on “OpenType”. In the dialog you can choose the figure style from the “figure” drop-down field.
In the latest versions of Microsoft Word, you can access the OpenType dialog by selecting “Font…” from the Format menu. From the “Font” dialog, Click on the “advanced” tab, and select “Lining” from the drop-down menu “Number forms:” in the “Advanced typography” section.

The fonts I bought came with a regular , readable version of the font, and a “shadow” version, which looks like a bunch of blobs. What do I do with the blobby version?

The Shadow version is used to create a “drop shadow” effect when that is desired. The basic way it works is that you set some text in the shadow font first, then set the same text on top of the shadow with the regular font, and BAM!, you get text with a drop shadow effect.

In order to do this, select the Type Tool from the Tools palette. Use the Type Tool to draw a text box the approximate size of your desired headline. Change the font to the Regular font and type in your desired headline, then set the color you would like to use. Next, select the text box and choose Copy in the Edit menu. From the same menu, select Paste in Back. Change the font to the Drop Shadow font and choose your desired shadow color in the Swatches palette.

Photo-Lettering App FAQ

I have one of these gigantic Android phones that catches on fire. When can I get some Photo-Lettering app action on it?

In 1996 we still didn’t “dig the web as a medium,” so progress moves slowly at House Industries.

How can I ask a question that is not addressed in this incredibly inadequate FAQ?

Please contact us.

How do I adjust the size of my type?

You can grab it with two fingers to freely scale and rotate. You can even make it huge and bleed it off the image.

Sometimes my text disappears from the screen. How do I get it back?

A little button that says “recenter text” should pop up. Just press that and your text will return to the middle of the screen. You can also hit the checkmark and start over if the “recenter text” button does not appear.

I downloaded an update, but all of my fonts are not available.

Scroll to the end of the font menu and click on “restore all purchases.”

Isn’t it cool that the name Photo-Lettering is relevant in a new medium?

Sorry, we know that we’re not supposed to ask ourselves questions in a FAQ, but we thought it was okay since this one is rhetorical in nature.

What’s this Photo-Lettering thing about anyway?

The original Photo-Lettering was a mainstay of the advertising and design industry in New York city from 1936 to 1997. PLINC, as it was affectionately known to art directors, was one of the earliest and most successful type houses to utilize photo technology in the production of commercial typography and lettering. We purchased the Photo-Lettering collection in 2003 and have tried to preserve the collection’s legendary sense of style while while making it available to a new generation. Still awake? Please read more here.

I found something really annoying about the Photo-Lettering app. Who do I tell?

There are carbon-based life forms at House Industries who would love to hear your feedback. Please contact them here.