Licensing FAQ

How much do your fonts cost?

Our pricing varies by collection. The best way to get basic and extended pricing is to click the “Buying Options” button at the top of each font collection’s page.

Where can I read the font licenses?

They are here.

Aw geez, I gotta read the whole thing?

Well, yeah, since you’re agreeing to its terms and all. If we all know the rules of the game, we’ll get along better.

What kind of font licenses can I purchase on this internet web site?

Traditional desktop license: This license is for traditional “desktop” use. This means you can install the fonts on a personal computer and use them for designing things, writing letters or just making big pretty words. The license fee is determined by how many devices can access the fonts.

Webfont license: This license is specifically for CSS @font-face “webfont” embedding. The license is sold per domain (subdomains are included) and the price varies with unique page views. Each domain is a separate license.

Mobile App License: Please contact us for mobile app pricing.

What if my usage does not fall under these three categories?

We handle these on a case-by-case basis. Please contact us and we can get you sorted out.

We have licensed your fonts and used them for a project. We are sending it to another vendor who is doing more work on the project. Can we just send your fonts along?

No. We license our fonts like software, as do most font companies. For example, if you give your vendor an Adobe Illustrator file, are they going to demand that you give them a copy of Adobe Illustrator as well? You spent the money to license the fonts properly, why shouldn’t they?

We have a font server, so do I only have to buy a license for the fonts for that single device?

No, you need a license for all the devices connected to that server that are going to use the fonts. The license reads “rasterizing device”. Any computer connected to that server considered a rasterizing device.

I am using your fonts to do a layout. I am collaborating with another designer in a separate location. Can I give them your fonts?

No, you cannot. We consider that a separate license. The fonts are licensed like software. If you’re both using Adobe Illustrator, Adobe’s license does not allow you to give the other designer a copy of the software. Same deal with the fonts.

Adobe Fonts Retirement FAQ

How will the retirement of fonts affect my websites?

If you used Adobe Fonts to serve House fonts to your websites, Adobe will continue serving those fonts to your website as long as your project is still published. New projects on Adobe Fonts will not have House fonts available. If you remove a House font from a published project, you will not be able to add again.

Will I still be able to use retired fonts in my documents?

You will not be able to use retired fonts from Adobe Fonts, but we’re here to help you license our fonts to fit your future licensing needs. Just contact us at customer service to let us know how we can help!

Where can I find out more about retired fonts on Adobe fonts?

Adobe has a guide to retired fonts.

What about my Adobe Marketplace font licenses?

If you licensed a House font from the Adobe Fonts Marketplace you still have your license. Note that Adobe retired the whole Font Marketplace in November of 2019, but that does not change your access to the fonts either. You can find out more on the Adobe FAQ.

Web Fonts FAQ

How do I use these woff and woff2 web fonts?

The woff and woff2 files are the standard formats for fonts used on web sites. You need to store them somewhere on your server, the same way you would with image files you are using on your web site. Then in your CSS style sheet, you implement an @font-face statement that refers to these files and assigns them each a nickname. Then in your CSS code, when you specify a font style and use that nickname, the browser will render the text using the web font, just as if the user had that font installed on their local system.

How do I use my web font on Adobe Fonts (formerly Typekit)?

We apologize that our automated system is currently down. We are working on correcting this. If you have purchased webfonts and would like to use them on your Adobe Fonts account, please email a request to [email protected] and attach your purchase receipt, and we will set that up for you.

How do I get capital height numbers instead of the bouncy up and down ones on my web site?

Numbers that have different heights are referred to as “text figures” or “old-style figures”. This style is intended to blend well with upper and lower case test and is best used in the body of text. Numbers that are all the same height as the capital letters are referred to as “lining figures” or “capital height figures.” This style is often used for headlines, or in tables of numbers.

Many of our fonts have the default numbers in the “text” style, with the “lining” style also in the font. In that case you can access the “lining” style by using CSS feature code calling out the “lnum” OpenType feature, similar to the following:

p {
font-family: “Neutraface Text”, sans-serif;
font-weight: normal;
font-kerning: normal;
font-variant-ligatures: common-ligatures, contextual;
font-variant-numeric: lining-nums;
-moz-font-feature-settings: “kern”, “liga”, “lnum”;
-ms-font-feature-settings: “kern”, “liga”, "lnum”;
-webkit-font-feature-settings: “kern”, “liga”, “lnum”;
font-feature-settings: “kern”, “liga”, “lnum”;
}

When I ordered web fonts, I received only .woff and .woff2 format files. I’ve heard about all these other formats, what about them?

The woff format (and the soon to be widely supported woff2) is sufficient for all modern browsers, as noted here: http://caniuse.com/#feat=woff

If you have a particularly odd use case which you believe requires another ancient format, please contact us.

Font Tech FAQ

So I bought this amazing, fantastic font. What now? How do I use it?

Third Party font management software:
If you’re using Suitcase Fusion, FontExplorer, FontAgent, or another third party utility, it would be best if you follow the instructions that came with the utility.

Macintosh OSX instructions:
Unzip the archive you downloaded from our web site. Double click on the font files (the files with .otf extension) to launch Apple’s FontBook utility.

Windows instructions:
Unzip the archive you downloaded from our web site. Right click on the font files (the files with the .otf extension) and select “install” from the flyout menu.

OpenType comments:
House Industries ship fonts in the OpenType format, which is compatible with all current versions of Macintosh OSX, Windows and Linux.

Technical support is available at [email protected] or by calling 302-234-2356.

How do I get capital height numbers instead of the bouncy up and down ones in my desktop programs?

Numbers that have different heights are referred to as “text figures” or “old-style figures”. This style is intended to blend well with upper and lower case test and is best used in the body of text. Numbers that are all the same height as the capital letters are referred to as “lining figures” or “capital height figures.” This style is often used for headlines, or in tables of numbers.

Many of our fonts have the default numbers in the “text” style, with the “lining” style also in the font. In that case you can access the “lining” style by using OpenType features.

In the Adobe Creative Suite programs, you can access the OpenType dialog by selecting the Window menu, then the Type flyout menu, then clicking on “OpenType”. In the dialog you can choose the figure style from the “figure” drop-down field.
In the latest versions of Microsoft Word, you can access the OpenType dialog by selecting “Font…” from the Format menu. From the “Font” dialog, Click on the “advanced” tab, and select “Lining” from the drop-down menu “Number forms:” in the “Advanced typography” section.

The fonts I bought came with a regular , readable version of the font, and a “shadow” version, which looks like a bunch of blobs. What do I do with the blobby version?

The Shadow version is used to create a “drop shadow” effect when that is desired. The basic way it works is that you set some text in the shadow font first, then set the same text on top of the shadow with the regular font, and BAM!, you get text with a drop shadow effect.

In order to do this, select the Type Tool from the Tools palette. Use the Type Tool to draw a text box the approximate size of your desired headline. Change the font to the Regular font and type in your desired headline, then set the color you would like to use. Next, select the text box and choose Copy in the Edit menu. From the same menu, select Paste in Back. Change the font to the Drop Shadow font and choose your desired shadow color in the Swatches palette.

What Languages do House Industries fonts support?

The truth is that support does vary between some of our earliest fonts, such as the General Collection fonts, and newer fonts such as Neutraface or Eames Century Modern. However all of our fonts support at least: Afrikaans, Albanian, Basque, Catalan, Danish, Dutch, English, Filipino, French, Galician, German, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Malay, Norwegian, Portuguese, Swahili, Swedish, Zulu.
If you have needs for support of other languages, please contact us at [email protected] or by calling 302-234-2356.

House Industries Lettering Manual FAQ

My Copy of the Lettering Manual Fell Apart!?

A Message from Our Publisher:

Due to an unforeseen production issue, some copies from our first spring 2020 printing of the Lettering Manual have faulty bindings. If you have purchased such a copy, we are so sorry! We’re working on fixing the problem and would like to replace your copy at no charge. Please keep (and use!) your current book. Now is a great time to learn a new skill like hand lettering.

Until we’re able to get repaired books to your bookseller, we will handle replacement directly. To receive a replacement book, please send your name, mailing address (no PO Boxes, please), and phone number (for shipping), along with a digital photograph of your damaged binding, to [email protected]. We will send you a replacement copy of the book just as soon as we can. Thank you for your patience, and for your support of the House Industries Lettering Manual.

–Ten Speed Press